Laser Photonics Introduces the CleanTech™ Titan Large Format Laser Cleaning System

Laser Photonics Introduces the CleanTech™ Titan

Large Format Platform for Surface Cleaning and Preparation

Orlando, Florida – Fonon Technologies, Inc. today announced the release of CleanTech™ Titan, the latest in their CleanTech product line. Marketed under the Laser Photonics™ brand, the industrial-grade CleanTech laser products are used for surface preparation, paint removal, and surface cleaning. CleanTech Titan is based on Laser Photonics’ large stationary flatbed platform with sizes up to a 6’ x 13’ flatbed.

The large format allows for applications such as cleaning automotive tire rims, mold cleaning, phlanges for the oil and gas industry, or even sheets for a hull. CleanTech laser systems offer a non-abrasive cleaning system that is safer, easier, and more eco-friendly than traditional methods of surface cleaning. Incorporating proprietary Flexion technology allows the CleanTech systems to clean materials more quickly and more fully than other systems on the market.

CleanTech Titan Large Format Laser Cleaning

“Fonon is proud to offer yet another CleanTech system for those who specifically need large format, high throughput equipment.” said Dmitriy Nikitin, CTO of Fonon. “Now we have a complete product line to offer companies anywhere from small machine shops to large global corporations.”

Some of the features and benefits of the CleanTech Titan include a Direct Drive Motion System, an integrated laser and cooling system, and industrial-grade reliablility with a MTBF of 100,000 hours.

Included in the product line are the CleanTech Megacenter, also a stationary unit, and the portable CleanTech Handheld which is useful in the field or on the factory floor. Made in the USA, the CleanTech systems operate with full compliance to OSHA, FDA, CDRH conforming to “Push a Button” laser safety industrial operation. The CleanTech systems offer Class 1 enclosures for the Class 4 lasers. Additionally, CleanTech has an integrated dust and residue collection system and can allow for a 3D scanner option to clean parts with complicated shapes. To learn more, visit Laser Photonics

 

Fonon Introduces Flexion™ Technology in CleanTech Laser Surface Cleaning Products

Orlando, Florida, February 20, 2017 – Fonon Corporation (OTC: FNON) today announced the release of Flexion™ technology to be incorporated in the CleanTech™ product line. Marketed under the Laser Photonics™ brand, CleanTech laser products are used for surface preparation, paint removal, and surface cleaning. The newly released CleanTech systems offer a non-abrasive cleaning process that is safer and more eco-friendly.

Flexion technology provides a distinct advantage over other laser cleaning systems on the market. Flexion technology allows CleanTech to remove rust, paint, anodization, and other surface materials in areas that are typically difficult to reach. Most other systems are statically positioned which limits the laser cleaning ability to only the static path of the trajectory beam.

As an analogy, imagine the sun and the direction of its rays hitting an object at 12 o’clock noon. The sun’s rays either hit the object directly over the top or depending on the object’s angle from the sun, it will hit the side of the object that is exposed to the sun’s rays, thereby leaving the other areas unaffected.

The CleanTech Megacenter with Flexion technology offers a motion control stage that operates in both x and y axis, allowing the ability to move in various directions and clean nested parts under the path of the trajectory beam path (Figure 1). This unique technology allows the laser cleaning process to efficiently affect 100% of all sides of the exposed parts. The Megacenter is available as a standalone or can easily be integrated into a production line.

Flexion Technology in Cleantech laser cleaning products “Fonon’s Flexion technology opens the door for smaller companies to adopt the most advanced laser technology for modern manufacturing,” said Dmitriy Nikitin, CEO of Fonon. “Unlike other products, which are often simplistic and sometimes not even safe; we have invested the effort, the degree of difficulty, and the vision needed to build our Laser Cleaning Equipment with full compliance to OSHA, FDA, CDRH conforming to Class 1 Laser Safety “Push a Button” Industrial Operation. We are proud that our advanced line of CleanTech products is unmatched in the industry for meeting safety requirements and turnkey operation.”

Dr. Nikitin continued,“We’ve already started booking orders for the first U.S.-based line of industrial laser cleaning equipment and the applications are endless; whether it’s aerospace depainting, marine rust removal, automotive pre-welding ablation, or hi-tech parts cleaning for bonding applications.”

Made in America, Laser Photonics’ CleanTech product line can be used for various applications across a multitude of industries including:

  • paint and epoxy removal for items such as aviation parts
  • mold cleaning for the rubber and tire industries
  • weld preparation
  • metal parts cleaning
  • anodizing removal
  • surface conditioning for better adhesion
  • corrosion removal for items such as surgical instruments
  • rust removal
  • degreasing

Included in the line are the CleanTech Megacenter Stationary Unit; and the portable CleanTech Handheld which is useful in the field or on the factory floor. The CleanTech systems offer Class 1 enclosures for Class 4 lasers.  Additionally, CleanTech has an integrated dust and residue collection system and can allow for a 3D scanner option to clean parts with complicated shapes. To learn more, visit http://www.laserphotonics.us/

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PRESS CONTACT:
Diane Merritts Gatto
Sr. Marketing Manager
407-477-5618 x.1911
dgatto@fonon.com

Solar Power Soars in United States; Top 10 Solar Projects Under Construction

From a news story in Forbes
The United States added a staggering 3.3 gigawatts of solar power capacity in 2012, according to a new report by GTM Research and the Solar Energy Industries Association.

To put the scale of solar power’s rapid and relentless expansion in perspective, the solar power capacity added in 2012 was greater than all of the solar power capacity added for the three previous years combined. If you’re not impressed yet, consider the swell of super-sized solar energy projects scheduled to come online in the US over the next few years.

Top 10 Largest Solar Projects Under Construction Slideshow
#9 of 10
BlueChip Energy
Sorrento Solar Farm
Sorrento Solar Farm Capacity: 100 MW Developer: BlueChip Energy Location: Orlando, FL

Indeed, nine of the top 10 largest solar power projects currently under development are located in the US, according to SolarPlaza.

First Solar, the Tempe, AZ-based solar manufacturing giant, is developing three of the largest solar power farms in the world currently under construction – the Topaz Solar Farm in San Luis Obispo County, CA, the Desert Sunlight Solar Farm in Riverside County, CA, and the Agua Caliente Solar Project in Yuma County, AZ. These three projects alone will have a combined capacity of nearly one and a half gigawatts of electric power when they are completed.

Like First Solar, Sempra Generation and SunPower also have mega scale solar projects in the pipeline in California and Arizona.

The surge in solar power capacity deployed in 2012 is not surprising given the history of global investments in solar energy over the past decade. From 2004 to 2007, global private sector investment in solar energy increased nearly twenty-fold, according to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This investment trajectory and the resulting market expansion has driven down costs across the solar supply chain and made it considerably cheaper to generate electricity with solar technologies than it was previously.

Solar Innovation Marches On (Part IV)

From a news story in seekingalpha.com:
“Some time ago, we started a series on solar energy innovation that proved quite popular (part 1, part 2, part 3). While there is steady and gradual progress in conversion efficiencies (the part of sunlight converted into electricity) and cost, there are companies and labs all around the world working on more radical concepts.

Radical concepts that could offer existing solar players (almost all of them already deeply plagued by market circumstances) a run for their money, but at the same time offer a critical break through to a future without subsidies and mass adoption.

We feel that investors in existing solar companies (or any company) tend to be insufficiently aware of industry characteristics. For instance, many investors were focusing on the growth in demand and steady cost reduction, while having insufficient appreciation for the lack of pricing power, due to the fact that solar cells are a near commodity. This often turned out to be a costly mistake.

Also, insufficient weight is often given to the lack of a dominant design and the fact that literally hundreds of labs and relatively unknown, often non-public companies are trying new approaches, any one of which might lead to a more radical break-through in price and/or efficiency.

For existing players (and investors in these companies), all this innovation from so many different corners presents a clear risk, the risk that some other company will eat their cheese, but for society as a whole, this is a giant trial and error race towards affordable clean energy, enlisting some of the best and the brightest.

So here is the fourth installment of our survey of promising new technologies and concepts on the horizon.

MIT
One approach to get solar cells to convert more sunlight into electricity is to build cells that react to a wider gamut of frequencies. This is what researchers at MIT are doing, creating an all carbon solar cell that captures much of the near infrared spectrum (40% of the sunlight’s energy hitting earth) which normal solar cells don’t convert.

The idea is to uses these cells in combination with normal cells capturing the visible light:
The carbon-based cell is most effective at capturing sunlight in the near-infrared region. Because the material is transparent to visible light, such cells could be overlaid on conventional solar cells, creating a tandem device that could harness most of the energy of sunlight. [MIT]

Before you’ll get overly enthusiastic, the very much experimental cells at present offer only a 0.1% conversion efficiency, which is terribly low. But there are good hopes this can be significantly improved in the near future.

New Jersey institute of Technology (NJIT)
The NJIT is working on a concept that will ultimately enable consumers to print sheets of these solar cells with inexpensive home-based inkjet printers… Imagine someday driving in your hybrid car with a solar panel painted on the roof, which is producing electricity to drive the engine. The opportunities are endless [Dailytech]

The concept is based on solar cells made of polymers, a material that is way cheaper than the purified silicon (the same material used for making microprocessors), and is much easier to handle.

North Carolina State University
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a method to sandwich the active layers of cells between a ‘nano sandwich.’ This allows the active material to be way thinner (amorphous silicon can be 70nm, in stead of the usual 300-500nm thin), without compromising their conversion efficiency.

This method can be applied to a wide range of active materials, not only amorphous silicon, but also cadmium telluride, copper indium gallium selenide and organic materials.

Fraunhover and Dow Chemical
The US research institute and chemical giant have together developed an ‘elixer’ to shield solar panels from all kinds of environmental influences that could lead to a degradation in performance. This is rather important, as the economics of panels are such (almost all up-front cost) that it depends critically on durability. Panels have to be able to keep working with little performance degradation for periods up to 25 years.

Instead of laminating panels with ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA), the scientists used liquid silicone. After this hardened, they subjected it to rigorous tests, which showed that these were more durable.

Advanced Solar Photonics

While not from the lab as such (this is a company with commercial operations, here is a brochure (pdf) with their product lines), the US company also addresses the durability of panels. They have done that through encapsulating solar modules two sided by glass. This dual sided glass modules provide dual sided protection from extreme weather conditions and are expected to have a usable lifetime of 50 years.

They have other tricks up their sleeve though, like a cheaper optical tracking system or:

To further increase efficiency, ASP modules feature a holographic material sandwiched between the silicon and EVA layers maximizing the time per day they can generate electricity from the sun. [sacbee]

Berkeley National Laboratory, the University of California, and the DOE
Researchers from these institutes have arrived at a method to use virtually any semiconductor material for solar cells, opening the door to low-cost, high efficiency cells. At present, expensive semiconductor materials are used, such as large crystals of silicon, or thin films of cadmium telluride (CaTd) or copper indium gallium selenide (CGIS).

Previously, cheaper semiconductor material like metal oxides, sulfides and phosphides have been difficult because it was expensive to taylor their properties by chemical means (called ‘doping’). What the researchers did was to tailor these materials simply by applying an electric field:

Our technology reduces the cost and complexity of fabricating solar cells and thereby provides what could be an important cost-effective and environmentally friendly alternative that would accelerate the usage of solar energy [greenbuildingelements]

Thin Film
Despite very tough market circumstances, particularly for start-up thin film producers, there is still plenty of activity and innovation in this sector. This sector faces two sets of problems. First is that more traditional silicon based technologies, which are generally more efficient, have come way down in price, negating much of the cost advantage of most thin film based manufacturers.

Second, since there is so much overcapacity in the market, clients are very hesitant to go with new companies, these might not be around in 5 or 10 years time, and it’s also more difficult to get project financing.

Stion
The American producer of thin film panels is already commercially active, with plants in California and Mississippi. It is backed by famous venture capitalist Vinod Khosla, but also a host of others (AVACO, a private Korean equity fund, Taiwan Semiconductor, Lightspeed Venture Partners, Braemar Energy Ventures and General Catalyst Partners).

The company didn’t start production before it was ready and was very frugal with capital. The company has achieved a 13.4% conversion efficiency for it’s CIGA based modules, which is a record for commercial panels. It is presently offering panels for $0.75 per watt, which is very competitive if you realize that market leader First Solar’s production cost (first quarter figures) are 73 cents per watt.

Flexible cells from Stanford University
One of the problems with solar panels is that because of the plunging price of cells and panels, the cost of installation is often higher than the panels themselves, and these costs are less susceptible to efficiency improvements or cost cuts.

One way to deal with that is to make solar panels light and flexible. The active material in thin film technologies is thin enough to be just that, but the substrate isn’t, as that’s usually rigid material like glass. Now, there are thin-film panels that are flexible, but these have drawbacks, like having complex manufacturing processes or expensive flexible substrates with extremely uniform surfaces.

Here comes Xiaolin Zheng, from Stanford University who can transfer the active materials of thin film cells to other surfaces, such as a sheet of paper(!) or plastic, the roof of a car, or the back of a smartphone. His trick is to use a layer of nickel between the fixed substrate and the active layer.

Using water which reacts with the nickel, the substrate becomes loose and can be peeled away and deposited onto another material, not affecting the efficiency of the cells. Very much a work in progress, but any commercial success could make cells ubiquitous.

UCLA
Researchers at UCLA are using polymer solar cells to arrive at much the same end result: flexible (70%) transparent cells that can be integrated in windows, buildings, and electrical devices. The transparency is achieved by absorbing infrared light, not visible light and using a transparent conductor made of a mixture of silver nanowire and titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which was able to replace the opaque metal electrode used in the past. At just 4%, it’s electricity conversion efficiency leaves something to be desired though.”

Exerpt from http://seekingalpha.com/article/1128221-solar-innovation-marches-on-part-iv

Solar Roof – enerG Magazine Story

A Solar Roof

Magazine article about solar on roof providing massive amount of electricity for manufacturer via rooftop solar panels.

News Flash: Solar on roof makes news in the enerG Magazine Sep-Oct 2012 issue